Tag Archives: handwritten

Peyton Manning Would Agree

30 May

I thought today’s blog post could focus on something that really means something to me … handwritten thank you letters.  Of course, that would seem almost absurd for me not to say that considering that I work for The Stationery Studio.  However, it is true.  I love sending and receiving handwritten thank you letters and notes.  It seems that four-time NFL MVP Peyton Manning feels the same way I do.

I came across an article yesterday in the Los Angeles Times about Bronco’s Quarterback Peyton Manning and how he has, throughout his career, been sending handwritten thank you letters and notes to other players.  He even went on to say that while he was being recruited to play in college, the first thing he looked for was handwritten notes versus form letters and how that impacted his decision.  That’s pretty powerful.

I admire Peyton Manning for discussing his love for handwritten letters and thank you notes as most people probably wouldn’t think of a football player taking pen to paper unless it involved a contract.  Manning credited his mother for instilling the importance of handwritten gratitude.  That’s an important lesson for children (and adults) to remember when taking a moment to thank someone.

I have to admit that I really don’t know much about Peyton Manning, but it impressed me immensely that an all star NFL player respects the art of a handwritten letter.

xoxo

Jennifer

SOURCELA Times

Will “Downton Abbey” Inspire You to Write?

16 Jan

The popular, award winning PBS series “Downton Abbey” returned this month to the delight of fans everywhere.  The characters always receive news via handwritten letters.  In the age of tweeting, facebook, email and Instagram, could this show bring back the art of letter writing?  I sure hope so.  Nothing leaves a bigger impression on someone that receiving a handwritten letter or note card.  What a pleasure to open your mailbox to receive a handwritten note from someone instead of just a pile of bills and catalogs.  Take a moment to tell someone how much they mean to you or to thank them for something they’ve done.

Happy Writing!

Xoxo,

Jennifer

Saying Thanks in Style!

2 Jan


A Refresher Course in Writing Thank you Notes

By Sue Fox, StudioNotes Etiquette Expert

Saying “Thank You” with handwritten note cards is a gracious and traditional way to repay holiday kindness – especially in today’s fast-paced world of changing technology. With less formal options of e-mail, texting, and social networks, writing a thank-you note is still absolutely necessary.

A handwritten thank-you note is a shining example of repaying kindness with kindness. It also expresses your gratitude and makes others feel appreciated. More importantly, it shows respect.

The excuse of having no time to write a thank-you note isn’t acceptable. Think about all the time and effort, not to mention the expense that may have been involved in providing a favor, a gift, a dinner, lending a sympathetic ear, putting a party together, or other acts of generosity. The silence is disappointing to the giver, but has bigger implications—hurt feelings.

Writing thank-you notes isn’t terribly difficult or time consuming—it takes just a few minutes at the most!

When you sit down to craft a thank-you note or letter, be yourself and write with sincerity. Your letters and notes should reflect your personality, as if you were talking with the recipient in person. Be sure to use the following basic elements in the structure of your note.

  • Always use a salutation or greeting. Depending on your relationship, you may use either a first or last name and appropriate title.
  • Keep in mind that three to five sentences are all that’s necessary in the main body of your thank-you note.
  • Always refer to the gift, deed, or act of kindness by name (not just “Thank you for the present”) and describe the deed
  • If you’ve been given a gift, say what you like about the gift and mention how you plan to use it.
  • If someone went out of the way to help you, mention the actual deed and how that person’s support was beneficial.
  • Include a closing sentence. You want your closing statement to flow with the letter or note. The closing sentence can be a final mention of your appreciation or something as simple as “I hope to see you soon.” Always end on a positive note.
  • Close your letter appropriately. Depending on your relationship, a close can be personal (“Yours truly,”) or formal (“Respectfully,”)

Here are a few additional tips on writing personal or business thank- you notes.

  • Thank-you notes should be sent within a week at best. If it happens to take a bit longer, don’t apologize or make excuses for why you’re late.
  • Neatness counts! Take a deep breath just before you begin. If you mess up somewhere along the line, start over with a fresh piece of paper, note card, or envelope. Strikeovers, ink blots, messy erasures, etc. are not acceptable.
  • Thanking people for something usually follows the form in which the invitation was extended. If you receive a telephone invitation, a telephone thank-you is appropriate, although a thank-you note is a nice touch. If you receive a written invitation, you should always write a thank-you note.
  • Thank-you notes are not reserved for parties and dinners. The general rule is this: If someone goes the extra mile for you, a thank-you note is appropriate; if the thank-you is just for day-to-day business, a verbal “Thank you” is good enough.
  • If you’ve been a houseguest and are continuing to travel, send a thank-you postcard from your next destination rather than waiting until you arrive home to send a thank-you note.

And, like just about everything else in life, the habit is learned young! Remember mom and dad—children learn by example. When parents give children a pass on showing gratitude with pen and paper, they foster a sense of entitlement—to invert the popular saying, you can get something for nothing in this world.